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rapscaLLion
09-15-2005, 08:12 PM
I guess mine is not the opinion you'd like to hear because I am not (yet?) a professional, but I am also thinking about switching to dual LCD's (from dual CRT's). I would suspect however, that issues come into play with how true the monitor's representation of color is, I know some LCD's tend to exaggerate color. I would also hazard to guess that the LCD's refresh speed would affect anyone working with compositing matte paintings, so something with high timings would not be recommended. The monitors I am looking to buy are samsung models with 8ms refresh times... pretty much the fastest I could find.

Another question you'll want to ask yourself: What resolution do you prefer? Because many LCD's only perform well at their native resolution and look poor at others.

Davibuddha
09-16-2005, 12:05 AM
Hio,

By far the best LCD I've seen and used is the Dell FP2400w 24" monitor, also 12ms timing, with gigantic 1920x1200 HD res ready. The color range and gamma is amazing for an LCD, so much that I finally replaced my old 19" viewsonic CRT I've had for 6 years. You can get it cheap on a deal sometimes at 899$ at places like bensbargains.net, regular is 1199$ I think. It's brighter and better than the new Apple cinema displays, runs DVI and on most video cards out today (not needing dual-link DVI capable cards like the Apple's 30" screen). That's my reccomendation, but like much else, shop around and do much research before investing in such a monitor, I did extensive searches on the web and reviews before buying (and it came really cheap with the deal for an LCD of this resolution!)

Hope that helps!

Jay_Gladwell
09-16-2005, 06:29 AM
You may want to take a look at Planar. http://www.planar.com/

chickensoup
09-19-2005, 02:23 PM
my experience with LCD's vs. CRT's is that I generally prefer a CRT for color accuracy and values. I've noticed after using Sony 21inch wide LCD and the Apple Cinema Displays, that the black levels aren't accurate. They tend to drop on the low end, and I've had matte work that was done on the LCD's show matte lines on a CRT. They do look pretty and slim, but I wouldn't recommend them for painting. I've also had issues where my gamma values changes from using a LCD and then switching to a CRT. I spent more time checking my makeshift photoshop levels gamma LUT's on an LCD than I did on CRT's. LCD's are great for websurfing and home entertainment systems, not for professional work.

-drew

kevjenkins
09-23-2005, 03:46 PM
dont bother with lcds, i am afraid as far as color calibration and accuracy crts are still much better.

jfrancis
10-22-2005, 02:59 PM
I have to admit I'm pretty happy with my HP 2335.

Perspex
10-24-2005, 12:35 PM
Hi, I'm not a matte painter pro...but I'm a pro designer and webdesigner working in advertising agency...You will never see a LCD screen in production department...as say upper, problem with calibration are legion...want no problem?? Use a LaCie CRT... we all use LaCie in advertising industry.. :D

Jessy
10-24-2005, 02:04 PM
After some long talk about LCD VS CRT... I dicided to go with the Dell ultrasharp LCD. Didn't receive it yet, so I did not have time to play with it, but here is what convince me to do the change...

First, if you paint with 2 screen, if you have 2 LCD, they will keep the same ajustment. Also if you are sending your work to an other LCD monitor, you know it would look exactly the same in your client office that it those on your own.

Also the LCD (and that's an opinion many person in the industry have) is closer to the luminosity of film (when project in theater) then a CRT monitor.

Also, because it is more "bright" it's easier to see mistake in your painting. I think the problem we have is the bright feeling of the LCD... we are not use to it. But If LCD become the standar than I guess, its luminosity will be the reference. Since then, and because we are use to it, CRT will continue to feel more natural, but I think it is just a question of habit.

Storm
12-08-2005, 01:06 PM
hi @all,

thinking about buying a new monitor i found out that the LaCier 22" blue is not produced anymore...after looking on the internet for a while i am thinking to swicht to TFT´s....i found this one after comparing many..the Eizo FlexScan S2410W...http://www.eizo.com/products/lcd/S2410W/spec.asp

so, what do you think about this one? good enough for matte painting and illustration? or still buy a crt (iiyama or so...)

cheers,
rene

rrische
12-08-2005, 01:47 PM
My $0.02- go with CRT's. I wouldn't do film work on anything else.

I have Viewsonic's at home. I recently did a couple paintings
for a commercial, sent them in to the client, and when the spot
finally aired, said "Yup, they look the same."

smooth
12-08-2005, 03:07 PM
I don't understand why one can't color calibrate the LCD to accomidate for film. U can even output to a digital tv for preview with PSCS2. I have a Mitsu diamondplus 22" and I'm thinking of getting an lcd.

+smooth+

rrische
12-08-2005, 04:28 PM
Why can't you calibrate an LCD to match film? Because LCD technology
isn't capable of reproducing the full contrast spectrum accurately.
Plasma and DLP televisions have the same limitations, although all
the technologies are getting better all the time. I'm sure one day
soon, LCD displays will match or best CRT displays, but not yet.

Since contrast is SO crucial in visual effects work (value being
much more important than color in the way human vision works),
I'm sticking with CRT's for now.

rrische
12-08-2005, 04:46 PM
Also if you are sending your work to an other LCD monitor, you know it would look exactly the same in your client office that it those on your own.

This is only an asset if your final output is another LCD monitor.

Also the LCD (and that's an opinion many person in the industry have) is closer to the luminosity of film (when project in theater) then a CRT monitor.

Not true. Motion picture film is capable of a HUGE value range that no digital
device is capable of fully reproducing, not even CRT's can. But CRT's
do the best job of approximating what you'll get when you output to film.
And if "many people in the industry" thought LCD's did a more accurate
job, we'd all be using LCD's.

Also, because it is more "bright" it's easier to see mistake in your painting. I think the problem we have is the bright feeling of the LCD... we are not use to it. But If LCD become the standar than I guess, its luminosity will be the reference. Since then, and because we are use to it, CRT will continue to feel more natural, but I think it is just a question of habit.

Not at all. When I'm working on a matte shot, I routinely throw on a levels
layer that cranks brightness and contrast, so I can see mistakes in my
value range. This is especially helpful to see mistakes that won't be
apparent until the film is transferred to video. However, I don't want to
work with that "layer" turned on all the time. There's no getting around it:
CRT's will take you accurately to the film recorder and the movie theater,
LCD's will not. Not yet, anyway.

Storm
12-31-2005, 07:49 AM
hi rick,

i decided to buy me a crt 22".....the flatscreens with AG pitch have these to lines appearing on the screen i heard....have you that too on your viesonic monitore and does it desturbing you when you are working??

i have 3 monitors in view:

Philips 202P40
Iiyama Vision Master 513
Viewsonic P225F

witch one ?

greets and a happy new year...
Rene

graphmac
01-19-2006, 06:05 AM
LCDs are better for what CRTs can do for me now,
Making games and textures etc...
I have two monitors, a 22" Samsung and a 19"CRT Iiyama.
The Samsung LCD is sharper, but the colour is not as exacting as the Iiyama but to be honest I can't tell much more than opening a colour pallette and switching between monitors. Very close.

I think for printed matter and 'old' film use a CRT, but for web - portfolio stuff and games use a CRT.


Motion picture film is capable of a HUGE value range that no digital
device is capable of fully reproducing, not even CRT's can. But CRT's
do the best job of approximating what you'll get when you output to film.
And if "many people in the industry" thought LCD's did a more accurate
job, we'd all be using LCD's.

Aren't we using digital cameras these days?!?

rrische
01-19-2006, 07:51 AM
Shooting feature movies using HD cameras is still
far more the exception than the rule.

Revenant-Graphics
03-09-2006, 10:41 AM
i'm not a pro

i have an eizo s2110wk (16:10) and 1650x1080 native resolution. It's such an improvement to my old samtron 96p crt (19"). very sharp and well lighted in all edges.

i'll recommend it :)

graphmac
10-16-2007, 01:41 PM
Is anyone using a decent LCD monitor for matte painting these days?
My monitor is getting on my tits with its crap colour reproduction.

It's an aging samsung 213T.
Any comments welcomed.

RiKToR
10-16-2007, 02:25 PM
I paint on my MacBook LCD, but I paint in 16bit and I dont use all white or all black because I know my image will go back to my CRT for final color correction.

Aren't we using digital cameras these days?!?

Yes we are in some films, but many still use film. But even if we were stricktly using digital cameras we still use 4:4:4 HD cameras like the Genesis that basically create 12bit color pallette that still is beyond the gamut of CRTs and further beyond LCDs.

rockhoppermedia
10-17-2007, 06:59 AM
CRT, LCDs are so wrong. For colour correcting makes sure your CRT has been switched on for at least 30 minuts prior.

This is how we submitsend to high end printers

Rich

Pete Michaud
01-08-2008, 07:49 AM
I've been reading this topic with interest, and I'm interested that the newer answers are mostly the same as the answers from '05 -- is it really the case that no progress has been made on LCD quality in the 3 years since this thread began?

I use LCD monitors at home, and while I'm not a professional, I do produce work that's printed and hanging on people's walls -- I haven't noticed a problem with the colors being different printed compared to my LCD monitor.

Maybe I'm just more forgiving?

Timmay
01-08-2008, 07:57 AM
Well I just bought an HD LCD and I've been messing with it for days to match my CRT. It just seems like I can't get enough detail in the blacks as my CRT. I calibrate it, then mess with the monitors settings like brightness/contrast but it just won't match exactly but it's close.

So like most people, I just work on it, and then when I'm done I'll use my CRT for final color correction.

emptyslot
01-08-2008, 10:26 AM
most people in the buisness as i know work with both a highly calibrated crt and a dvi connected LED LCD from Samsung, Nec or Dell if you are a real freak on colors get a good sony crt too for comparison.. that should do it..